Tag: school

Jul 16 2009

Serious fun: part 4

By Kelly Demo, CFCA preacher

Soccer has grown from an obscure game played by a handful of kids to being the most popular, organized sport for children in the U.S. With more than 3 million youth registered each year in formal leagues, soccer has firmly established itself as part of the American childhood.

Without knowing it, kids who play soccer here in the U.S. are aligning themselves with the millions, perhaps billions, of children worldwide who play soccer (more commonly known as ìfootballî). However, these kids in developing countries donít always experience soccer with minivans, uniforms, coaches and juice boxes waiting for them when they are done. These are the kids who find any round object and a group of friends and play wherever they can find an open space. They run barefoot, kicking the ball through a goal they have fashioned out of scrap metal or their imaginations.

Henry Flores, director of the CFCA Communications Center in El Salvador, says that CFCA staff will often organize soccer games with the scholarship students because they find this to be a great way for staff to connect with the youth.

ìWith these games we are telling the students, ëWe want to spend time with you!í î Henry also observes that soccer is only fun when you play with others. It is a community sport. It unifies responsibility, ability and discipline.

Marissa Gargaro plays soccer during a mission awareness trip to El Salvador.“Plus, you donít need lots of equipment, just a 25-cent ball and a small space in your community. You often see children in the different communities who spend hours playing street soccer. When a vehicle is passing trough you hear, ëGAME OFF / GAME ON!í to let the children know.”

Often, when there have been teen mission awareness trip groups, the staff will organize soccer games because it is a simple way to break the ice, create community and strengthen bonds of friendship. “And,” says Henry, “You need no translator for it.”

In your next letter, have your soccer kid ask their sponsored friend about “football” in their country. Do they enjoy playing? Does their country have a national soccer team? Talk with them about the idea that they are in solidarity with their friend simply by playing soccer. What similarities does your child see in the way their friend plays football, and how soccer is experienced here in the States? What are the differences?

Related links
Serious fun, part 1
Serious fun, part 2
Serious fun: Creative play

Jul 1 2009

Serious fun, part 2

By Rev. Kelly Demo, CFCA preacher

Upon my return from a mission awareness trip to El Salvador, my children were greatly interested in the details of the trip. I told them about our day spent on a volcano, showed them a jar of sand from the beach and pictures of all the beautiful people I met. And, I kept wistfully talking about pupusas, calling them ìSalvadoran comfort food.î

We decided to make pupusas, and we had the most fun! They are so simple to make and so wonderful to eat. The best part, however, was how making dinner together easily fell into a lesson about solidarity. For instance: at first, our dough was too dry. As I went to the sink for more water, I started talking about how hard it often is for the women to get water and how easy it is for us. The kids asked questions about where the water comes from for the Salvadorans and began to understand how a simple faucet is a luxury.

As we pulled the cheese from the refrigerator, my daughter asked me how they keep things cold with no electricity. So, we talked about how they have to go to market every day to buy food since people in developing countries generally donít have a refrigerator. (My kids hate going to the grocery store, so the idea of going to market every day really hit home!)

Below is the recipe for pupusas (they are super easy for kids to make), but we encourage you to do a little research to find kid-friendly recipes from the country where your sponsored friend lives. As you cook with your children or grandchildren, talk with them about what it must be like for their friend to cook. How is it the same? How is it different? Tell them what an indescribable luxury meat is in most countries, but how easily we have access to it here. Have them picture walking up to a mile to fetch water for cooking (this is often the job of children in a family).

(Please supervise children closely during the cooking.)

2 c. Masa harina (this is a corn flour that can be found in most grocery stores)
1 c. Water
Filling can be grated cheese, refried beans, veggies, whatever!

1. In a bowl mix the Masa harina and water. Knead it well. If you need to, add a teaspoon of water at a time to get a consistency similar to play dough. Set the dough aside to rest for 10 minutes.

2. Roll a ball of dough a little smaller than the size of a baseball and, with your thumb, press a hole in the middle. Pinch the sides a bit to make the hole bigger. Put some of the filling in the hole and pinch it shut. Now comes the fun part. Slap the dough from hand to hand, pressing it out flat. But make sure none of the filling leaks out. They should end up about º – Ω inch thick.

3. Heat an ungreased skillet over medium heat. Cook each pupusa for 1-2 minutes or until golden brown on each side. Serve with salsa.

Related links
Serious fun, part 1
Serious fun: Creative play
Make Filipino oatmeal soup
CFCA food benefits in Kenya

Jun 25 2009

Serious fun

Schoolís out for summer! Kids are lost in a lazy haze of swimming, camps and vacations. But, as the excitement of having no homework fades, it is often replaced with, ìMom! Iím booooooored!î

What a great time to encourage solidarity with their sponsored friend. Have them do a little research about the country, culture and history of their friend. The library has wonderful books for all ages about different countries. This will make letter writing easier, too, because the research may stir up good questions they can ask of their friend.

Over the next four weeks, we will offer some ideas and activities that you can do with your children or grandchildren that will teach them about other cultures.

Global play
The most global, common element about childhood is play. Children play. Even when faced with inhumane conditions and hardship, it is part of a childís nature to engage in some kind of play. There are many games that are manifested in areas all around the planet in various forms (hide and seek, tag, jump rope games, etc.) but there are many games that seem to be organic, having grown out of the imaginations of a nationís children. The following is a game that children play in Chile.

Mar, Luna, Sol (Ocean, Moon, Sun)
You need a couple of steps where the children can stand side by side. This can be the front porch or the steps of a pool.

The bottom step (or the ground) is Mar (ocean). The next one up is Luna (moon) and the top step is Sol (sun). One person is the caller. The caller says either, ìMar, Luna or Solî and everyone has to jump to that step. The caller keeps choosing different levels and everyone must jump to that step. If a players jumps to the wrong step, they are out. The last one left standing wins and gets to be the caller.

There are many great Web sites where you can find games that are played by children in your friendís country. Research the games together with your own children or grandchildren. Then, let the games (and the learning) begin!

You can also look at our 2008 edition of Sacred Ground for more games around the world (look at page 15 of the pdf).

Related links
Serious fun, part 2
Serious fun: Creative play

Jun 1 2009

Focused on his children

Daniel, 18, was first featured in the opening edition of The Scholar. Since that edition, Daniel was sponsored, graduated high school and started his journalism studies at a university. Here, his father reflects on raising his children and seeing Daniel graduate.

As told by Daniel’s father to Henry Flores, director of CFCA’s communication center in El Salvador.

Daniel ErnestoMy name is Daniel Ernesto, I am 46 years old and I was born in Santa Ana, El Salvador.

I have two brothers, however, we did not grow up together.

When I was little, my father decided to take me to his sisterís house to live with her because neither of my parents could take care of me. My father died when I was 2 years old, so I did not get to meet him.

My aunt did not have any children, so she gave me everything I needed. Now that I am an adult, I realize that family is more important than having everything you need. The family and the mother offer a natural trust.

My aunt was a teacher. She died when I was 19 years old. However, I was blessed to finish high school and had some extra education in electricity.

When my aunt died, and I got married, I started to work in anything that would give me some income. I did carpentry, bricklaying, etc. When you want to accomplish things, you need to put forth all your efforts. Good things are hard to get.

One of the most difficult moments in my life was when my wife left me and our three children. I stayed with the three of them. From one day to the next, I had to wash their clothes and cook for them. I remember I used to get up very early in the morning to do all this.

It was very difficult for me to adapt to my new situation as a single father, but I trusted God so much. He has never left me alone.

Raising my children was hard, but I had solid moral values. I told myself, “I have gone through this, I grew up without a father or a family, I donít want my children to live what I lived.” My mother even told me to let her raise the children, but I told her that I was going to be their mother and father.
Read more

Apr 15 2009

A good experience at Good Earth

Danielle Litt is a college student from the U.S. who volunteered with the Centro Educativo La Buena Tierra, (The Good Earth Education Center). CFCA partners with La Buena Tierra to provide services to sponsored children. Children sponsored through the CBT subproject are either attending or have attended the pre-school program Danielle describes below, and older children are served by the centerís staff in after-school programs, in addition to other benefits.

Dear CFCA sponsors,

My name is Danielle Litt. I am from New York City and am a junior at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (Go, Tar Heels!). I am majoring in Latin American Studies and minoring in Hebrew. This semester, I am studying abroad in Cuernavaca, Mexico, and I have had the amazing opportunity to intern at La Buena Tierra, the education center that serves the children you sponsor.

I performed a variety of tasks including translation of the childrenís letters into English. I enjoyed reading these letters, as it gave me an opportunity to learn more about the lives of the children. I enjoyed reading about what they do for fun, hearing their stories and learning about the struggles they face and overcome. I also enjoyed reading about how important you, as sponsors, are to them, and seeing all the thank-you letters. The children are so appreciative of the letters and photos you send them!

The children play games.Let me tell you a bit about a typical day at the Buena Tierra. The children enter the school one by one, tell each teacher good morning and greet them with a kiss on the cheek. Then the children proceed to breakfast, but first say grace, which includes thanking God for you, their sponsor. The staff also teaches the children good table manners. During the day, the children learn about a variety of subjects, including the alphabet, counting, nutrition, families and animals. At the center, there is a lot of singing, playing, drawing, laughing and learning. At the end of the day, all the children gather together, sitting on blankets. They have story time and sing songs.

There are so many amazing people who make it possible for the children to attend the center. The teachers work patiently with every student to ensure they are learning and being challenged. The students come to class with smiling faces and an eagerness and excitement to learn. They are what makes all of the work worthwhile. The childrenís families contribute any way they can and support their childrenís attendance at the center. And while you are not physically at the center, your presence is felt by your sponsored child and the whole organization that feels gratitude for your contribution. Each sponsored child is provided with the opportunity to have a preschool education and begin elementary school with the skills needed to succeed. Older sponsored children are alumni of the school and receive after-school tutoring to make sure that they are keeping up in their classes.

Although I am excited to return back to my community in the United States, I will be sad to leave the Buena Tierra behind. Although you donít know me, I have great appreciation for the gesture you have made by sponsoring a child through CFCA, as you reach across borders of class, nationality, ethnicity and age to show solidarity and provide opportunities for the children who are served through the Buena Tierra. You are doing something that truly matters!

Thank you,
Danielle L. Litt

Mar 24 2009

Notes from the Field #7 – El Salvador

Tim Deveney, manager of preacher relations, introduces us to parents Don Enrique and DoÒa Angelina in El Salvador. Although the couple was unable to attend school when they were young, Don Enrique and DoÒa Angelina value learning and make great sacrifices to provide their children with an education.

Editor’s note: Hazel was sponsored during a parish appeal on Jan. 24, 2009. Learn how you can volunteer to help at a parish appeal.

Nov 5 2008

Notes from the Field #4 – Honduras

Melissa Velazquez, a mission awareness trip coordinator for CFCA, talks about the support of education in Honduras by CFCA parents.