Tag: scholarship program

Oct 26 2012

CFCA scholars open academic club for sponsored children

Sponsored children in Kenya

Students listen attentively to the CFCA scholars during a tutoring session.

By Regina Muburu, CFCA communications correspondent for Africa

It is a hot Tuesday afternoon and sponsored children are gathered at a local CFCA office in Kenya, with their books and pens, keenly following what they are being taught.

The teachers of the day are Vincent, who is pursuing a degree in business administration and accounting, and his colleague, Kevin, who is enrolled at a local university studying for a bachelor of commerce degree.

The two students are both 23 years old and part of the CFCA Scholarship Program.

“As scholars we volunteer hours of community service to the CFCA office helping out in various duties. It is during this period that we noticed that the children in our area were not performing well [in school],” Vincent said. “Looking at the report cards as scholarship students, we felt there was a need to step in and help.”

The two scholars decided to create an academic club for sponsored children who needed extra help with their studies.

The club is facilitated by 17 scholars who choose different subjects, in which they excel, to tutor the sponsored children. These subjects include mathematics, business education, science and geography. Read more

Aug 14 2012

How sponsors raised an additional $329,000 for CFCA in 2011

Last week we mentioned employer charitable matching gifts and how they work. In 2011 these matching gifts raised an additional $329,000 for CFCA.

This guest post is from CFCA sponsor and volunteer Paula Kiger, who participates in her employerís matching gift program and shares how easy it is for her to double her donation to CFCA each year.

CFCA sponsor donates matching gifts

Paula Kiger and Father Arthur Kirwin, O.P., at a CFCA weekend presentation in Douglasville, Ga.

Less than five minutes a month.

That’s how long it takes to double my contribution to CFCA by participating in my employer’s charitable matching gifts program.

Many employers match donations made by their employees to approved charitable causes.

The first day of every month, I email verification of my donation to CFCA.

Next, CFCA verifies the donation with my employer, who matches my $30 monthly sponsorship contributions.

The $30 from my employer goes to CFCA’s scholarship fund, which helps youth pursuing secondary, post-secondary or vocational training with their educational costs.

If your workplace has a matching gifts program, and you are already a CFCA donor, I hope you will consider this great opportunity to double your donation. Read more

Jul 13 2012

CFCA scholarship allows sponsored youth to achieve his dreams

The CFCA project in Legazpi, Philippines, recently sent us success stories from young adults who were sponsored through CFCA.

Here’s one from Jeffrey, who is hoping to graduate from college after many challenges along the way.

Jeffrey in the Philippines, sponsored through CFCA as a child My name is Jeffrey. I am 19 years old, the second-oldest child in a family of seven. My father is a hard-working farmer, and my mother is a housewife.

I am very proud of them both, and I am a witness of their unending love, care and support.

I was in grade four when one of the biggest changes in my life happened.

I was recruited as one of the members of the CFCA family through the sponsorship program. It gave me additional self-confidence to pursue my studies.

My father struggled to support my and my brother’s educational needs. So my mother decided to work as a housemaid.

It is very hard waking up early in the morning knowing that your mother is not there, and enjoying those days were never easy for us.

She once said to me, “Anak, kahit mahirap tayo, sainyo naming ibubuhos lahat n gaming pag-asa sa buhay (My child, even though we are poor, we will give to you all we can because you are our hope in our life),” and after saying this, she would surprise me with a big hug.

After finishing grade six as a class salutatorian, my self-determination grew. Read more

Jun 19 2012

My journey: A CFCA scholar’s story

The CFCA project in Legazpi, Philippines, recently sent us success stories from young adults who were sponsored through CFCA.

Here’s one from Jeanelle, who is training to be a registered nurse after many challenges along the way. Congratulations, Jeanelle!Jeanelle, CFCA scholar

My life started to change when I was in fourth grade.

My mother had an interview and home visit from the CFCA staff. At that time I started to receive support and benefits from CFCA.

I received a complete set of school supplies, school uniforms, school shoes, groceries, utensils, a bath towel and much more.

When Sir Ed, my sponsor, wrote his first letter to me, I was really excited to read its contents.

One morning, our staff brought good news to us. Sir Ed decided to visit us. We prepared some delicious foods and souvenirs for him.

When Sir Ed arrived, he told us that he wanted an additional sponsored child from our family and chose my sister, Judith Mae.

When it comes to CFCA activities, thanksgiving Mass, recollection, goal orientation related activities and livelihood trainings, my family always made ourselves available.

My mother was chosen as parent leader and CASARO (CFCA Community Adjoins to Strengthen Aging & Children-Sponsorsí Relationship Organization) officer. Read more

Aug 12 2010

Xarina: The busy student

Xarina, from Philippines


Today is Aug. 12, International Youth Day, and we look at one youth’s outstanding example of helping others in need. Xarina is a participant in the CFCA Scholarship Program and was featured in the Summer 2008 issue of The Scholar. She was also one of the 13 scholars who performed at the 2008 CFCA concert in Zamboanga, Philippines. Alan Partosa and Maricar Castillo, both staff members from the Zamboanga project, managed to catch up with this busy nursing student for an interview.

What has changed since we last heard from you?
I am now in my third year as a nursing student. Classes have just started. I am taking 26 units for this semester, and 16 of those units are solely nursing major subjects and actual field exposure, while the other 10 units are for minor subjects in school. Subjects have gotten more difficult, and the number of required patients to attend to also increases. Each of us will now be handling 15 cases. This sounds both exciting and horrible! I hope that I can make it. Last May, I was elected as president for the nursing official choir called ìSYNAPSEî for the school year 2010-2011.

You were working in the community health clinic three times a week. Has this changed?
I am still doing clinical but this time I am exposed to patients with more serious illnesses, as well as helping patients in pre-op, post-op and under recovery. I still have the same routine three times a week but not in the community clinic, now it is in the hospital with seven rotations required.

At one time you mentioned you were worried about succeeding in your career. How do you feel now?
At this time, it is a mixed emotion. I discovered lots of things to love about nursing. As I am getting close to finishing this course, I encountered lots of challenges and greater responsibility in taking care of others is required. Iím still scared if I can cope with the demands of this course but, one thing Iím very sure … I will really become a NURSE.

What are your favorite subjects now? Last fall, you loved bioethics.
Iím done with bioethics and learned a lot from it but now, believe it or not, I love NCM (Nursing Care Management), which I hated before. NCM gives me a wider scope of understanding patients and what they are going through. Let me differentiate the impact of bioethics and NCM to me: Bioethics helped me understand different people that we met, while NCM taught me how to provide proper care to people we met.

Do you still work with pregnant women?
I was able to personally assist with an actual delivery in the community health center. This is really an overwhelming experience, and the school has really provided me all the knowledge to deal with this. Holding the newborn baby for the first time, wow, I canít really explain.

I was very lucky because after my community exposure, which mostly dealt with pregnant women, my first exposure in the hospital last February was in the OB-GYN ward. Though I already had an idea how to deal with the patients, I was assigned to a serious case. My patient is suffering from DUB (Dyspertinal Uterine Bleeding). This experience gives me an actual case. I was able to apply learning gained in NCM since my patient underwent a hysterectomy.

What about your homework schedule? Do you still stay up late doing homework?
As subjects get more difficult, I have to exert more effort. It is already a normal routine for me to stay up to 2 a.m. to do my homework and report to my hospital duty or classes from 7 a.m to 3 p.m.

What about your dance and music classes? Can you still fit those into your routine? Are there any new developments?
I still sing for weddings and other special occasions if it fits my schedule, especially since I also earn money from this. I am a member of our church choir on Sundays regardless of my hectic schedule. Now that I am the president of the nursing choir, I have to find time for it since we have regular practice, in which I am also really very happy because singing will always be my passion. I was supposed to audition for the dance troupe at the university as a kulintangan* instrumentalist, which I learned in my CFCA workshop. But, my parents did not allow me as they saw my schedules and daily routine and the demand as a nursing student. They again reminded me that education should always be the priority.

Is your service project still writing letters?
I still do the same thing, assist children in their letter- and card-making that is done in our community. Though, our subproject plans to train another group of kulintangan instrumentalists since a number of sponsored children also expressed their desire to learn to play the kulintangan. This sounds exciting, I hope the practice schedule will fit mine, and that this plan will materialize this year.

Do you still plan to graduate in 2012?
I hope to graduate in April 2012 and review for two months as preparation for the nursing board examination in July.

We have enjoyed following your progress through nursing school, Xarina. Is there anything else you would like us to know about your life? How is your family?
My family and I are doing well. My elder brother, Wendell, is in his fourth year as a nursing student, so I am very well guided with what to expect in my own nursing career. I still have my very loving and supportive mother around, which make things light and manageable. I also help my father, who has been sick recently. I monitor his blood pressure and medications.

*The kulintangan is a traditional Filipino instrument.

Apr 27 2010

Paying it forward

Bhaskar Karanampally is on his way to becoming a successful engineer, an accomplishment that few children in his neighborhood slum outside Hyderabad dream about.

Bhaskar with some of the children he tutors.

Thanks to his God-given talents and the encouragement and support of CFCA, Bhaskar is in his third year of engineering studies.

He persevered with his studies in the government school he attended, in spite of the substandard education provided there. In India, government schools provide impoverished children with access to education, but the schools lack basic infrastructure and skilled faculty.

Most students drop out, as did Bhaskarís sister and brother. He was about to end his studies because his family could not afford to pay for his higher education. The income Bhaskar’s father earns from his neighborhood shop is just enough for the food and clothing needs of Bhaskar and his two siblings.

A CFCA social worker encouraged Bhaskar to stay in school, and he was admitted to the Swami Vivekanada Institute of Technology in Hyderabad.

ìMy dream is to complete my technology degree with good marks and work as a software engineer,î Bhaskar said. ìItís because of CFCA that I am able to dream of this new goal in life.î

Bhaskar is eager to repay the help he received from CFCA. In the evenings, he conducts a study hour for the neighborhood children and helps them with their homework. Mothers from the neighborhood have witnessed how Bhaskarís involvement is boosting their children’s self-esteem.

Bhaskar offers a study hour to children in his slum.

ìHe hails from our own slum,î said Nagamani, a member of a CFCA mothers group. ìHe is not only able to help the children, but has such a positive influence on them.î

Bhaskar is proud to be a role model.

ìI know for most of my companions, life was a missed opportunity, but I want to see these kids reach their higher goals,î he said. ìWhat makes me happy is that so many children in my slum now receive formal education, and that I am able to support and guide them.î

This was the feature story from the 2010 spring issue of The Scholar. You can read more stories like this one on our website.