Tag: Poverty

Roy does laundry on a weekend visit home from college.
May 1 2015

Laundry on the weekends

Roy does laundry on a weekend visit home from college.

Roy does laundry on a weekend visit home from college.


For many U.S. college students, going home on the weekends to do laundry is a time-honored tradition. The time waiting between loads is a chance to catch up with family, friends and pets, or maybe doing some homework.

Twenty-year-old Roy is from a rural area of the Philippines and is studying education at a nearby university. He is sponsored through Unbound, which helps him meet the costs of attending college. Though he goes home every Friday, and laundry is involved, his weekends look a bit different than those of many U.S. students.

Roy’s weekends are filled with farming and doing other chores in order to earn a weekly income. He returns to school on Sunday afternoon, or sometimes very early in the morning on Monday, to attend class.

When it comes to doing laundry, Roy and his family rely on their surroundings. Their home is located at the base of a mountain. One of the mountain streams provides water and plenty of rocks for washing clothes.

Roy knows how to work hard and applies that to his studies as well as his weekend work. He hopes to be a teacher when he completes his education and is creating more opportunities for himself and his family through his studies.

Click here to support the higher education goals of students around the world.

Peter, 47, from Kenya roasts goat meat for his customers.
Apr 27 2015

‘Behind every great man’


By Regina Mburu, communications liaison for Unbound in Africa

Peter has a big smile as he chats with his customers while weighing and chopping meat for them. Peter is from Kenya and works as a butcher, selling goat meat, raw or roasted, to support his family.

“I have been doing this for the last two years,” he said. “It gives me great joy to be a butcher. This job, though it seems messy for some, helps me put food on my family’s table.”

I follow Peter around his butchery, and the zeal with which he goes around doing his work is admirable. As he puts some meat on the fire to roast, Peter lets me in on the history of his business.

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Mary goes over a poem with her daughter, Veronica, who is sponsored through Unbound in Kenya.
Apr 22 2015

Mother and daughter poetry duo

Living in Kenya as a widow with six children hasn’t been easy for Mary. Aside from dealing with emotional loss and a lack of income, Mary and her children often faced disapproval.

“I have had to deal with negativity from the society that mistreats widows and single mothers,” Mary said. “I have had to overcome self-pity over my situation and that of my children — that has been the greatest challenge. Trusting in God and in a brighter future is what keeps me going.

“I am just grateful that Unbound stepped in when all my hope was lost,” she continued. “They sympathized with my situation and two of my children got sponsored. … I am also hopeful that with the help of the small mothers group loaning system I will be able to start up a livelihood business in the near future.”

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Barclay Martin speaking to high school students about "Rise and Dream."
Mar 13 2015

How 13 Philippine teens gave U.S. students a lesson

Letters are an everyday part of the Unbound program — they’re the bridge that connects people throughout our world. Hundreds of thousands of letters from sponsored friends pass through our Kansas City headquarters each year on their way to sponsors. With all the correspondence that passes through our office, some letters still come as a surprise.

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Sponsor a child
Feb 23 2015

Help Jaishikha find a sponsor


She is 4 years old and full of giggles. She sings. She counts to 10 in English. She listens to songs and then creates dances to go with them.

Her name is Jaishikha. She is nothing short of precious.

Jaishikha lives with her mom, dad and baby brother in a small, dark room in a crowded Indian slum.

Her parents struggle. Neither had the opportunity to go to school. Jaishikha’s father works hard in a hair and nail salon, but doesn’t make enough money to meet the family needs for shelter and food.

Despite their difficult life, Jaishikha smiles. All the time.

“We want her to be educated and successful,” said her mom, Reena. “My only dream is for my child to get a proper education so she will be proud.”

Editor’s Note: Since this post was published, Jaishikha has been sponsored. Click here to view other children still waiting for a sponsor.

Maynor, 7, from Guatemala.
Feb 11 2015

Happy Make a Friend Day

Happy Make a Friend Day! At Unbound, we’re all about creating meaningful relationships between sponsors and sponsored friends. To celebrate Make a Friend Day, we’d like to give Maynor the opportunity to make a new friend.

Maynor enjoys drawing and playing soccer. Maynor’s father earns an income by working in the cornfields as a day laborer, and Maynor likes helping his father in the field. Maynor, his parents and four siblings are living in a one-room adobe hut. It has a corrugated-tin roof and a dirt floor. His mother takes care of the domestic chores, and the family lives on the father’s earnings. The amount isn’t enough to meet their everyday needs. For Maynor, sponsorship would mean a better situation for his entire family.

Be Maynor’s friend today.

Editor’s note: Since this post was published, Maynor has found a sponsor. Click here to view others still waiting for a sponsor.

Diego
Jan 28 2015

‘It’s hard because it’s worth it’

Diego

Diego, a sponsored youth and scholarship recipient in Costa Rica.

Diego faced many challenges when he decided to go to college and study teaching. Classes were far from home, and transportation costs as well as food and education fees began to add up. Although difficult, Diego stuck with it.

“I kept telling myself, ‘this is hard because it is worth it. It will be fruitful someday,'” Diego said.

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Hortensia
Jan 26 2015

Help a 68-year-old woman achieve her dream

Hortensia

Hortensia enjoys reading the Bible, and reads it every night before going to bed.


Horetensia lives in a small town to the west of Guatemala’s capital with her husband, Victor. At 68, she has a clear dream for her future.

“I dream of living my elder years with good health, and I dream of not having to work so hard anymore,” Horetensia said. Laughing, she added, “I no longer have the strength to work hard; it’s not that I turned lazy.”

Hortensia has been working hard all her life. She and her husband started their family in Guatemala City more than 40 years ago. He worked as an auto mechanic, and she had a small business selling tortillas. They had 10 children, though two of them passed away in infancy.

When Victor started having strokes, which made him lose the ability to walk for some time, the burden of supporting their large family fell solely on Hortensia.

Read more about Hortensia

Anna and Fred
Jan 21 2015

Rising together

Fred and Anna

Fred and his great-aunt, Anna, from Uganda.

“I knew without proper education, his life would turn out bleak,” Anna said of her grandnephew. “I had to do everything within my reach to help him go to school and learn.”

The 72-year-old Ugandan woman took over the care of Fred when he was just 8 months old after the untimely death of his parents. Fred’s mother was Anna’s niece, whom Anna also cared for. Growing up, Fred has always just referred to Anna as his grandmother.

Anna found herself in a position to help her extended family after the end of her 29-year marriage. Anna’s husband, a polygamist, banished her from his home because Anna did not bear him children. She moved in with her ailing brother who soon died, leaving his children and grandchildren, Fred among them, in her care.

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Henry Flores
Dec 22 2014

‘They need opportunities, not blame’

Henry Flores

Henry Flores records sponsored members playing soccer in Mexico.


By Henry Flores, director of the Unbound communications center in El Salvador

During a filming trip to the Dominican Republic, the director for the shooting told me, “I want to portray the sponsored members, the poor, in a way that describes who they really are. I know what the world tells me the poor are, please tell me what they are not!”

Our general conception of those living in poverty has been modeled by what we have seen or read, creating for many a preconceived image of the poor. After 20 years working with poor people and communities in many countries, I can tell you they are not what we´ve been told.

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