Tag: nonprofit work

Amos Kihoro, youth program coordinator for Unbound in Nairobi.
Aug 10 2015

Bridging the gap between teens and adults

Amos Kihoro, youth program coordinator for Unbound in Nairobi.

Amos Kihoro, youth program coordinator for Unbound in Nairobi.


Amos Kihoro, youth program coordinator for Unbound in Nairobi, recently visited our headquarters in Kansas City. He shared stories about the young people he works with and offered advice on communicating with and understanding young adults.
Read his Q&A here

This stack of letters was written by Kansas City-area middle school students to Unbound sponsored youth waiting for new sponsors.
Jul 17 2015

Sending notes of encouragement


Letter writing is an important aspect of Unbound’s sponsorship program. Not only do we require sponsored members to write at least two letters a year to their sponsors, we encourage sponsors to write back. We frequently hear from sponsored members how much getting letters from their sponsors means to them. Sometimes those letters have the ability to change lives.

But when sponsored friends are between sponsors, they don’t have anyone to write to or receive letters from. When sponsors must discontinue their support, their sponsored friends continue to participate in the program and receive assistance while Unbound tries to find new sponsors for them.

Currently, we have more than 5,000 children, youth and elders waiting for new sponsors. Some of them have only been waiting a couple of months, while others have been waiting a couple of years. They’re missing out on a huge part of the Unbound program experience.

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Jolly, a youth sponsored through Unbound in the Philippines.
Jul 10 2015

Hope through education and sponsorship

Jolly, a youth sponsored through Unbound in the Philippines.

Milestone moments don’t happen every day. For Jolly, a sponsored youth in the Philippines, graduating from college is one of his happiest memories. While most graduates walk toward the stage to get their degrees, Jolly was walking toward his mom.

“When my name was called by the host in our graduation, my mother was clapping her hands,” said Jolly, a sponsored youth living in the Philippines. “I was the one who got her hand and we walked together up the stage. She was the one who put the medal on my neck. I was so happy that moment,” he said.

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Maria finds discarded items that can be fixed and resold to support her family.
Jul 3 2015

Mom recycles for a better future

The old adage, “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” rings true for Maria’s family.

She and the other six members of her family work hard reclaiming items from the streets of their Mexican neighborhood.

“First, I am a mother. This is my first and most important job,” Maria said. “I enjoy doing overtime mother’s work, even if I don’t get paid for it,” she laughed.

But in order to pay the bills, Maria has a very different job — she is a pepenadora or one who searches through trash for a living.

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Jolly, a member of the fathers group in Unbound’s Cardona program, cuts water hyacinth stalks to be made into sandals and other wearable goods. Once a fisherman, Jolly has found a new source of income in the water hyacinth initiative.
Jul 1 2015

A green initiative


Water hyacinths, a persistent pest, clog waterways, kill fish and rob sunlight from native aquatic plants in lakes all over the world.

A community in the Cardona area of the Philippines, just outside Manila, experienced such an infestation. In 2012, when Charito L. and her family joined the Unbound program, her husband wasn’t able to continue his job fishing because of the plant. It became increasingly difficult to support their family.

“My source of income way back then was selling fishes but, because of the huge number of water hyacinths in the lake, the fishes died out,” she said.

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Florencia and three of her children inside her vegetable garden.
Jun 29 2015

Urban gardening in Bolivia

From left: Florencia, her daughters Carina and Mikaela and her son Giancarlo, center.

From left: Florencia, her daughters Carina and Mikaela and her son Giancarlo, center.


Florencia used to beg her husband for enough change to purchase a small amount of vegetable so she could make soup for her children.

“Most of the time, I just prepared it with water and very few vegetables,” Florencia said.

Florencia is the mother of four children, two of whom are sponsored through Unbound in Bolivia. Florencia participates in the Unbound urban agriculture program in her area, which means begging for spare change is no longer part of Florencia’s routine.

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Elizabeth makes pastries outside her home in Nicaragua.
Jun 24 2015

‘I am going to fight’

Elizabeth makes pastries outside her home in Nicaragua.

Elizabeth makes pastries outside her home in Nicaragua.

On a good day, Elizabeth earns $3.78 selling pastries she makes in the home she shares with 12 other family members.

That’s a good day. Sometimes, she makes less.


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Rolando and his youngest daughter, Nataly, enjoy spending time together.
Jun 19 2015

The dreams of a father

Rolando and his youngest daughter, Nataly, enjoy spending time together.

Rolando and his youngest daughter, Nataly, enjoy spending time together.

Rolando didn’t have a father growing up in Cartagena, Colombia. His dad died in a car crash when he was just a baby, and his mother died from diabetes when he was only 3 years old.

“I don’t recall much of my parents,” Rolando said, “but I remember my mother being a hard-working woman, and remember her selling fried food downtown. … The one thing I remember from her is the big love she gave us; that is something that I still have inside me.”

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Fatuma and her daughter Fosia, an Unbound sponsored youth.
Jun 17 2015

Fasting for Ramadan

Fatuma and her daughter Fosia, an Unbound sponsored youth.

Fatuma and her daughter Fosia, an Unbound sponsored youth.


Most of the major religious traditions of the world have an appreciation for fasting. While they vary in specific practices, the religions share a recognition of fasting as a sacred discipline that teaches self-control and respect for the gift of sustenance.

Muslims are about to enter into Ramadan (June 17-July 17), the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, during which they fast daily from dawn to sunset. Ramadan commemorates the presentation of the Quran to the Prophet Muhammad and is considered one of the most important observances of Islam.

Fatuma is a single mother of nine children, two of whom are sponsored through Unbound. She and her family live in Kenya and are devout Muslims. Recently Fatuma shared with us what Ramadan means to them.

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Sponsored children and their classmates in Uganda.
Jun 15 2015

The Day of the African Child

Sponsored children and their classmates in Uganda.

Sponsored children and their classmates in Uganda.

On June 16, 1976, more than 100 students in Soweto, South Africa, were shot and killed and thousands were injured after a protest for equal and quality education for all children.

Tomorrow, June 16, is the Day of the African Child. This day has been celebrated every year since 1991 in memory of those who participated in the Soweto protest and to raise awareness for the continued improvement of Africa’s educational systems.

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