Tag: art

Mary applies a henna design for Unbound staff member Catherine Materu.
Mar 14 2016

Youth uses henna to pay for school

Mary, 17, from Tanzania

Mary, 17, from Tanzania


For a long time, Mary’s interest in art was simply a hobby. As a young girl, watching others draw henna designs on skin fascinated her. Now she uses this hobby as a way to earn money for school.

Seventeen-year-old Mary is an Unbound sponsored youth living in Tanzania. Because her parents separated when she was young, Mary and her siblings went to live with their aunt after their mother passed away last year.

“I used to depend on my mother for everything,” Mary said. “When she passed on, things changed. My aunt does her best to take care of me, but she also has her children, making it difficult for her to provide for all of us.”

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Simon proudly displays some of his art.
Feb 8 2016

“I can only go further”

Simon proudly displays some of his art.

Simon proudly displays some of his art.


By Regina Mburu, communications liaison for Unbound in Africa

Regina Mburu, the communications liaison for Unbound in Africa, recently visited sponsored friends and families served through our Kampala, Uganda office. One of the young men she interviewed is 24-year-old Simon, a sponsored youth currently pursuing his higher education goals.

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shija-featimg
Dec 2 2015

Painting a successful future

Shija walked up and stood beside the sign he painted. It read, “UNBOUND,” and colorful figures formed the logo beside the name.

Shija, a sponsored youth, painted the sign at the request of the local office in Tanzania. The staff knew he would be a good candidate for the job because he’s an artist who’s going to school for fine arts and graphic design.
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Serafina-FEATIMG
Oct 26 2015

Grandmother’s work as a potter sustains family

With three orphaned grandchildren left in her care, Serfina knew she needed a more reliable source of income than farming, which was susceptible to drought and crop failures. So she learned the art of making clay pots.


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Apr 4 2013

Making eco-friendly curtains and jewelry in Honduras

Thorn and seed curtains

Braulia, a CFCA sponsored elderly woman (right), and Cristina, daughter of a sponsored aging friend, sell their curtains and jewelry by a roadside in Honduras.

A group of mothers and daughters in Honduras recently shared with us a special technique they use to craft environmentally friendly curtains and jewelry from thorns and seeds!

Check out our interview with 10-year-old Tania, a CFCA sponsored child, who describes how she helps her mother make interesting and eco-friendly designs.

I’ll never forget the day I was sponsored because it was my birthday. I was turning 6 years old.

My name is Tania, and since that day I have become part of the beautiful and loving CFCA family.

I help my mother make curtains and bracelets by opening the little holes in the seeds and stringing them together.

I like to make the bracelets, but I don’t like to make the curtains because it takes too much time, and I get bored.

CFCA sponsored child

Tania, CFCA sponsored child in Honduras, helps make designs from thorns and seeds.

I want to invite my sponsor to come to my community. I would love to meet her and teach her how to make the bracelets and necklaces.

DIY thorn and seed curtains and jewelry in 3 steps:

  1. The first step is to look for the thorns, which we call “cachitos” or bull’s horns. This is the most difficult part of the process because a large number of stinging ants live inside the thorns and sting our hands.
  2. Next we have to get seeds. We use a seed called “Lágrimas de San Pedro” or Saint Peter’s Tears. These seeds are usually brought over from another community. We try to use any kind of seeds we can find in our community. We paint the seeds so they are colorful.
  3. Once we have collected all the necessary materials, we start to make our products. First, we make holes in the seeds and thorns. Next, we create a design and use fishing or metal string to make the curtains and other kinds of jewelry.

Read the full story about mothers making eco-friendly curtains in Honduras

steps

Feb 21 2013

Helping families achieve self-sufficiency, part 1: Kenya

By Kristin Littrell, CFCA correspondent

CFCA is not a one-size-fits-all organization. We rely on our field staffs to know the families in each community, to listen to their needs and hopes, and to provide a program that empowers them to build a path out of poverty.

We give you a window into several CFCA communities, to gauge the success of the Hope for a Family sponsorship program.

Hope for a Family in Nakuru, Kenya

Patrick and Rose

Rose and Patrick proudly display some of the items they sell at their art gallery.

A stone art gallery is tucked away down a bustling street in Nakuru,Kenya. Inside, beautiful wood and glass pieces, intricately woven baskets and skillfully sewn dresses are displayed across the spacious room.

The owners, Patrick and Rose, are passionate about their work.

Like entrepreneurs around the world, they honed their skills and opened this shop as a way to provide for their family.

Patrick and Rose are part of the CFCA family in Nakuru, Kenya.

Their son, Kevin, is sponsored, and Rose is a member of a CFCA mothers group in the area. The family was able to attain a loan to start their business through Rose’s mothers group. Read more

Mar 10 2011

CFCA inspires Salvadoran girl to paint her life

Roxana in El Salvador

Roxana created the painting, pictured in the background, which reflects her experience with CFCA Hope for a Family sponsorship.

CFCA recently celebrated 25 years of service in El Salvador. The sponsorship program began in El Salvador in 1985 with 25 sponsored children. Today, CFCA serves more than 12,000 sponsored children, youth and aging members around the country.

As part of the different activities organized by CFCA-Santa Ana to commemorate this special milestone, a drawing and painting contest was held for sponsored members who wanted to participate. The topic was “CFCA as hope for a family.”

Roxana Maribel, 16, won first place with her original painting, “Before and After.” It reflects her deep sense of transformation in the 14 years she has been sponsored through CFCA.

My name is Roxana Maribel. I am 19 years old and live in the city of Santa Ana in El Salvador. Since kindergarten, I enjoyed drawing and painting.

Over the years, I have taught myself different techniques. Nothing professional, but something I enjoyed as a hobby.

Roxana's painting

Roxana’s painting.

When I was told about the drawing and painting contest, I decided to participate with a painting that would somehow show myself reflected in it.

This painting reflects the changes in my life and the lives of many others, thanks to all the support I have received from my sponsor. To me, painting is a simple way to express my feelings and thoughts. I like people to see what I feel.

I feel happy that I won first place in the contest. My family was very supportive and felt happy with my achievement.

I have many dreams for my future. The main ones are to be closer to our Lord, to become a professional woman and to be able to help my family.

~Interview by Jorge Castaneda, communication center staff member; photos by Daniel Hernandez