Category Archives: India

India
Apr 22 2016

Celebrate Earth Day with photos

The Earth is a truly amazing place, from deserts to rain forests and ice-capped mountains. Check out these photos from some of the countries where Unbound works and immerse yourself in the sites seen by sponsored friends around the world.

Honduras


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Jaishikha (left) lives in northern India with her mom, Reena; dad, Sunil (not pictured); and little brother, Kabir.
Apr 6 2016

Homes around the world: Photo essay

In Valparaiso, Chile, there might be a lot of stairs to climb to get home …
In Valparaiso, Chile, there might be a lot of stairs to climb to get home …
… But there's also a spectacular view.

… But there’s also a spectacular view.

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Madelen, a former sponsored friend from Colombia.
Jan 15 2016

Faces of empowerment — photo essay

Madelen, a former sponsored friend from Colombia.
Joy in culture

Madelen, a formerly sponsored child, participates in a traditional dance with the Unbound community in Quibdo, Colombia.

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Adilia-FEATIMG
Nov 26 2015

6 stories of thanks from the Unbound world

As we celebrate Thanksgiving in the United States, we thought it would be good to have an encore presentation of some of the stories we featured on the Unbound blog in 2015.

Each of these stories reflects gratitude, expressed in many ways and for a variety of gifts. They represent just a few of the hundreds of stories we have presented over the years about people for whom thankfulness is not just an occasional sentiment but a virtue that marks every day of their lives.


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Dan-FEATIMG
Oct 19 2015

‘Saving one life is like saving the world’

Dan Pearson, director of international programs, recently gave an inspiring webinar talk to Unbound staffers around the world. He told a story about a sponsored child he met in India, and how helping one child now could affect millions in the future.


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This stack of letters was written by Kansas City-area middle school students to Unbound sponsored youth waiting for new sponsors.
Jul 17 2015

Sending notes of encouragement


Letter writing is an important aspect of Unbound’s sponsorship program. Not only do we require sponsored members to write at least two letters a year to their sponsors, we encourage sponsors to write back. We frequently hear from sponsored members how much getting letters from their sponsors means to them. Sometimes those letters have the ability to change lives.

But when sponsored friends are between sponsors, they don’t have anyone to write to or receive letters from. When sponsors must discontinue their support, their sponsored friends continue to participate in the program and receive assistance while Unbound tries to find new sponsors for them.

Currently, we have more than 5,000 children, youth and elders waiting for new sponsors. Some of them have only been waiting a couple of months, while others have been waiting a couple of years. They’re missing out on a huge part of the Unbound program experience.

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Manish and his mother
Jun 26 2015

Unbound sees success in India on child labor issue

Manish spent a good part of his childhood stationed outside the East Gate of India’s famed Taj Mahal.

By the age of 5 he was working long days peddling trinkets: bracelets, beads or cheap keychains.

Selling on the streets is dangerous work for little kids. They can become easy prey for thieves or victims of speeding cars and motorcycles.

But Manish had little choice. He is the youngest of seven. His father works, but doesn’t make enough money to feed every child in the family.


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Salvadoran mother Maria with sons Diego (left) and Osacar (right), who is sponsored through Unbound.
May 8 2015

Happy Mother’s Day!

Salvadoran mother Maria with sons Diego (left) and Osacar (right), who is sponsored through Unbound.

Salvadoran mother Maria with sons Diego (left) and Osacar (right), who is sponsored through Unbound.

Happy Mother’s Day from Unbound! As you get ready to celebrate your mom on Sunday, take a moment to check out all these amazing moms from around the world. They are overcoming great odds to give their children better futures.

And don’t forget to share your Mother’s Day photos with us on Monday. Post a photo on Instagram of your mom or a photo of you with your mom, tag @Unboundorg and use the hashtag #MotherMonday.

More than 1,500 sponsored children and youth participated in the 2015 Bob Hentzen Memorial Sports Day organized by Unbound staff in Hyderabad, India.
Apr 13 2015

The joy of 1,500 sponsored kids in India at play

Children and teenagers living in poverty don’t often get the chance to participate in organized sports. Participation fees and equipment costs add up, making sports a low priority for families struggling to afford basic necessities. So when Unbound staff in Hyderabad, India, organized the Bob Hentzen Memorial Sports Day, more than 1,500 kids sponsored through Unbound showed up for the event.

For Sarita Mendanha, program coordinator for Unbound in Hyderabad, the sports day is “extremely important to the India program because it builds team spirit, … [a] winning attitude [and] pride to carry away specially designed awards.” She also views the sports day as a way to build rapport between Unbound staff and the families they serve.

The day consisted of 15 different track and field events, such as tug of war, sack races, the traditional Indian game kho kho, shot put, discus throw and 100, 200, 400 and 800 meter dashes. Unbound staff had help from scholars and the participants’ mothers, and sports professionals were on hand to referee.

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Sushela from India
Mar 6 2015

Embodying International Women’s Day

By Elizabeth Alex, community outreach and media relations director

Sushela comes from the lowest, poorest caste in Indian society. Traditionally they have been forced to sweep the streets and clean other people’s latrines by hand. Under the caste system, Sushela shouldn’t be allowed to attend religious festivals alongside her social superiors. She could never be invited to their homes. It would be unthinkable for a person of her caste to share a cup of tea with the next one up.

Add the fact she was forced into marriage as a teenager to a man she didn’t know, expected to cook and clean for his family and was isolated under the less-than-loving supervision of her mother-in-law, you might believe Sushela leads a miserable life.

Wrong.

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