Category Archives: Economic Self-Sufficiency

From left: Maria, Concepcion C., Jesus, Rosa and Concepcion T. This group of mothers created a business raising chompipollo.
Jan 18 2017

A growing business of growing chicks

Guatemalan women work together for a better future

From left: Maria, Concepcion C., Jesus, Rosa and Concepcion T. This group of mothers created a business raising chicken hybrids known as 'chompipollo.'

From left: Maria, Concepcion C., Jesus, Rosa and Concepcion T. This group of mothers created a business raising chompipollo.

Unbound has long encouraged creative livelihood initiatives for our families. Five enterprising women from Guatemala have taken that encouragement to heart in starting their own poultry business.

Maria, Concepcion C., Jesus, Rosa and Concepcion T. are all moms in the same community. They each have children who are sponsored through the Unbound program, and it’s through this connection that they met.

“The staff has always encouraged us [parents] to start our own business,” Jesus said. “We thought this is something we like, we talked and we just said ‘let’s do it.’ We are happy that all five of us are doing this business; it’s a great benefit for all of us.”
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Dec 26 2016

Unbound in 2016

$105.3 million to the field - graphicAs 2016 comes to an end, we reflect on the past year with a lot of gratitude. Every one of our sponsors and sponsored friends has played a tremendous role in making a big impact around the globe. We’re happy to report that, in 2016 alone, we’ve disbursed more than $105.3 million in field support to our programs around the world, a one-year record!
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Mercy is proud to show off the fruits of her and her husband's work on their farm.
Dec 19 2016

Mercy works hard for her sisters’ education

Mercy is proud to show off the fruits of her and her husband's work on their farm.

Mercy is proud to show off the fruits of her and her husband’s work on their farm.


Mercy from Kenya is 29 years old, married and has three children. Mercy and her husband work hard to provide for their children along with Mercy’s younger sister, who she began caring for after her parents passed away.

“I take care of my sister, Caren,” Mercy explains. “My parents died a while back. I am the first-born in a family of six. I am charged with the responsibility of taking care of my siblings.”

Mercy takes this responsibility very seriously, but her and her husband struggled to provide for their own children and had difficulty paying Caren’s school fees on time.

“Each time I saw her chased away from school because of [a lack of] school fees, it hurt me a lot,” Mercy said. “I did not want her going through what I did. I had dropped out of school in class 8, because I had no one to help me pay my school fee.”

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The finished product: this fertilizer is ready to bag and sell.
Dec 16 2016

Fertilizer co-op provides opportunities for families

Parents of sponsored children from the northern Isabela Province in the Philippines make fertilizer to sell to local farmers. These parents have joined together to create SANKAPACO Cooperative. SANKAPACO is a combination of three words: Sagana, which means rich, Kaagapay, which means standing for each other or helping hand and pag-unlad, which means progress.

Parents of sponsored children from the northern Isabela Province in the Philippines make fertilizer to sell to local farmers. These parents have joined together to create SANKAPACO Cooperative. SANKAPACO is a combination of three words: Sagana, which means rich, Kaagapay, which means standing for each other or helping hand and pag-unlad, which means progress.

The impact of sponsorship ripples beyond just a monthly monetary transaction from sponsors to sponsored friends.

A group of 36 sponsored families from Isabela, located in the northeastern-most part of the Philippines, has banded together to create a fertilizer cooperative. They sell the fertilizer to generate income as they challenge poverty daily.

They began the cooperative in August 2015 with less than $40 of capital. That was all they needed to start the process of mixing all the right materials to create an affordable fertilizer they could sell to the many farmers in their community.

The sponsored families decided to create a fertilizer cooperative because Isabela is one of the country’s major crop producing areas for foods like rice and corn.

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Millicent, the mother of a sponsored child in Kenya, outside the small shop she runs to support her family.
Oct 17 2016

A path to freedom through participation

Millicent, the mother of a sponsored child in Kenya, outside the small shop she runs to support her family.

Millicent, the mother of a sponsored child in Kenya, outside the small shop she runs to support her family.

On Oct. 17, 1987, more than 1,000 people gathered in Paris at the site where the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights had been signed 39 years earlier. They came to publicly affirm their belief that being forced to live in extreme poverty is a violation of those essential rights. Five years later, the United Nations formally designated Oct. 17 as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

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Ramil goes out each day with other fishermen to support his family.
Sep 26 2016

‘I will do everything to be a good father’

Ramil, Domnick and Anita in front of their home in the Philippines.

Ramil, Domnick and Anita in front of their home in the Philippines.


Ramil wakes up at 4:30 every morning and ventures out on the sea to catch fish. Twice a day he heads out on the waters surrounding the Philippines for one reason: to support his family.

The father of seven children, including 10-year-old Romnick who is sponsored through Unbound, Ramil sees his job as a fisherman as the best way to provide for his family. After his first round of fishing for the day, his wife, Anita, sells the fish in the market while Ramil goes back out to bring in another catch.

Ramil has been doing this for 20 years.

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Jeba Mathi loves her job as a social worker for Unbound in Trichy, India, where she was raised by her grandmother and was a sponsored child herself.
Sep 9 2016

A grandmother’s wisdom and a sponsor’s love

Jeba Mathi loves her job as a social worker for Unbound in Trichy, India, where she was raised by her grandmother and was a sponsored child herself.

Jeba Mathi loves her job as a social worker for Unbound in Trichy, India, where she was raised by her grandmother and was a sponsored child herself.

Jeba Mathi is a social worker for Unbound in Trichy, India, and a former Unbound sponsored child. Jeba was raised in India by her grandmother, and had a special connection with her sponsor who was raised by her grandmother, too.

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