Tag Archives: sponsorship

Nov 29 2012

What’s the best way to let CFCA know when I change my address?

Ask Sponsor ServicesQ. I just moved to a new address. What’s the best, easiest way to let CFCA know?

A. We’re so glad you asked!

It’s important that we keep our records updated whenever you move, so that we can continue sending your sponsored friend’s letters to you at your new location (as well as your tax-deductible sponsorship contributions). If we cannot locate your new address in time, your sponsored friend’s letters cannot get to you.

The easiest way to update your mailing address is through your online sponsorship account. Click on the “Profile” tab to the right of the “Account home” tab. Then under the main “Account information” section, edit your details or confirm that the address we have on file is correct for you.

Change CFCA online account information

As an alternative, you can always call our Sponsor Services team at (800) 875-6564 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays or email mail@cfcausa.org.

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Nov 20 2012

What is required of sponsored children in the CFCA program?

Ask Sponsor ServicesQ. What is required of sponsored children in the CFCA program?

A. Once your sponsored friend is accepted into the Hope for a Family sponsorship program, there are a few requirements the sponsored friend and his or her family must meet in order to continue to be eligible for sponsorship benefits.

1. Education. All children and youth must be enrolled in school in order to be a part of the sponsorship program. CFCA values education as the door to opportunities, and through sponsorship benefits, all children have the opportunity to go to school and fulfill their potential.

Marcela, a CFCA sponsored child in India.

Marcela, a CFCA sponsored child in India.

For individuals who do not attend traditional school, such as individuals with special needs and sponsored aging friends, the project offers workshops and other gatherings so sponsored friends can enjoy group activities and experience personal growth.

2. Family participation. Many CFCA projects have begun to implement mothers groups or parent groups to develop a deeper sense of community and empower families. Through these groups, mothers and parents can opt to build up savings or take out loans to increase their income through small businesses, agriculture or raising livestock.

Read about Roseline in Kenya who started her own grain business, and Margaret in India who raised livestock to send her son to college.

Sponsored friends and family members also participate in meetings and CFCA events held in the local community. These meetings and events allow sponsored friends and their families to form close-knit relationships with others in the community, develop long-lasting friendships, and most importantly, build a sense of mutual accountability and support as a key to the development of their families and their communities.

Colombia family integration activity

Sponsored children and their families gather together for a family fun day in Colombia.

3. Another requirement of the sponsorship program is the sponsored child, youth or aging friend must write a minimum of two letters a year and take an annual photo. If a sponsored friend cannot write yet, then the CFCA social workers, scholarship students or family members can help them with their letters.

Read what one CFCA translator in El Salvador has to say about letter-writing campaigns.

4. Sponsored friends and family members must also meet with a CFCA social worker on a regular basis. Personal outreach is provided in every CFCA community. It is through this personal outreach that families become more involved and communicate openly with the staff. It is also a meaningful way for the staff to learn of a family’s individual needs and potential.

Click here to read about a day in the life of a CFCA social worker.

For more information, please email mail@cfcausa.org or call Sponsor Services at (800) 875-6564 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central time.

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Nov 6 2012

We ‘vote’ for children and aging people worldwide

Today is Election Day in the United States.

Penina, a CFCA sponsored child in Kenya.

Penina, a CFCA sponsored child in Kenya.

We are especially grateful today that we live in a country where we have the freedom to vote and make our voices heard.

At CFCA, we try to operate as though our sponsored friends are voting on every decision we make.

Read what some of our staff members had to say:

“When we face difficult decisions, we try to see the situation from the perspective of sponsored friends and their families. Ö How can we listen to them more closely, see CFCAís work through their eyes, amplify their voices and be guided by their wisdom?”
ó Dan Pearson, director of international programs

“For financial decisions, our platform is simple but taken very seriously: What is in the best interests of the children, youth and aging friends we are blessed to serve? For CFCA, election time comes each time a donor is considering a gift. We welcome being accountable for their vote.
ó Bill Hansen, accounting manager for the finance department

“The children, youth and elderly are present among us daily in child services through their photos and family profiles. We take great care with every detail shared about each life. We wish to present them in their best light, as we know they would vote to be presented as dignified human beings with as much to give as they will receive.”
ó Marcia Willman, director of child services

Every member of the CFCA community of compassion has a voice and a vote. We listen carefully to one another and the belief we have, one in the other, is a daily vote of confidence. This vote of confidence, this faith in one another is at the heart of sponsors walking a path into solidarity with sponsored friends and their families, who are walking a path out of poverty.”
ó Paco Wertin, CEO for CFCA

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Oct 16 2012

5 important things to remember about CFCA sponsorship

Maybe you’re a new sponsor, or maybe you’ve sponsored through CFCA for several years now. Regardless of where you are in your sponsorship journey, we’ve put together five “things to remember” that answer common questions about sponsorship and how it works:

CFCA sponsor

CFCA sponsor Kevin meets Tatiana, his sponsored child in Colombia.

1. Remember that CFCA sponsorship is a one-to-one relationship.

Every child, youth and aging person in our Hope for a Family program has one sponsor.

CFCA sponsorship provides sponsored friends and their families with resources such as education, food, skills training, micro-loans and participation in a caring, supportive CFCA local community.

While sponsorship benefits vary depending on location and family needs, the goal of the Hope for a Family program is to help families in their efforts to break the cycle of poverty.

2. Remember to write.

Writing a letter is one of the greatest gifts you can give to your sponsored friend. Read more

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Oct 10 2012

‘Hugs all around’ one sponsor’s trip to Guatemala

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By Stephanie Angalet, CFCA sponsor

This year I once again had the privilege to travel to Guatemala on one of the CFCA mission awareness trips. This trip was incredibly special because I was able to meet each one of the young ladies I sponsor in Guatemala.

Guatemala is a beautiful country and the people of Guatemala are beautiful people, both inside and out. I never cease to be amazed by the smiles on each person’s face, even though I know some of the difficulties they face each day.
Read more

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Sep 28 2012

First-generation student goes to college

CFCA sponsored youth Alfred.

CFCA sponsored youth Alfred.

Alfred is a sponsored youth from Bhagalpur, India, who is the first person from his village to attend college. Alfred is also a CFCA scholarship student, which helps cover other costs related to his education. Alfred sat down with Sreekanth, our communications liaison in India, to tell us about the academic and social challenges heís experienced as a college freshman.

Are you a first-generation college student? If so, how were you given this opportunity to attend college? Why did you decide to attend?

My father studied up to the ninth grade. He understands the value of education and encouraged me to study. Even though my college is very far away, he tried every opportunity to pay the fees and enroll me in school.

I am the first person to attend college from my village.

The hotel management and catering technology degree is a three-year diploma, and it is very expensive.

Though it is expensive, I preferred it because of CFCA’s sponsorship and scholarship support. I paid part of my college fees with CFCA’s help through sponsorship support and my CFCA scholarship. I was able to take out a bank loan for the remaining costs. Read more

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Sep 27 2012

Sponsored youth and scholar: ‘CFCA has been like a family to me’

Sponsored youth in Kenya

CFCA sponsored child, Purity, takes her education seriously.

Nineteen-year-old Purity is strictly business when it comes to education.

“My advice to fellow students is to be serious,” Purity said.

Purity is a first-year student at South Eastern University in Kenya pursuing a bachelor’s degree in economics, with help from her sponsorship through CFCA and a CFCA scholarship.

“CFCA has helped me throughout my education by providing school fees and uniforms,” Purity said. “I have a good relationship with my sponsor and they encourage me a lot. CFCA has been like a family to me.”

Purity and her four sisters grew up in a mud house on a small piece of land in Kenya. Her mother and father are both skilled farmers and they would try to find work as casual laborers on farms.

Although Purity’s mother and father found work, the humble income they earned was hardly enough to provide for everyone in the family.

“Sometimes we would go to sleep on an empty stomach,” Purity’s mother, Martha, said.

Purity remembers the challenges she faced before sponsorship. Her parents could not afford her school fees and Purity would then be turned away from school. Martha recalls these emotional times and how much it pained her to see her daughter so sad because she could not get an education. Read more

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