Feb 5 2013

Two of a kind: sisters in India open food stand

Curry Point

Jesintha, left, and Prakash at their food stand, Curry Point.

CFCA strives to help families achieve economic self-sufficiency. The Hope for a Family program aims to partner with families so that over time they may rely less on benefits from CFCA and more on their own income-generation activities to meet their basic needs.

We recently heard from our Hyderabad project in India about several mothers of sponsored children who are exemplifying the potential of families living in poverty. Here’s the story of Prakash and her sister Jesintha ó enjoy!

In 2010, my sister, Jesintha, and I started a food stand called Curry Point.

We prepare food items like dal, sambar, potato fry, brinjal curry, tomato pickle and chapattis (Indian bread) and other foods. We sell our meals at reasonable rates, so it is affordable for many.

I am Prakash. My sister and I are part of a mothers group in Hyderabad, India. She has a son sponsored through CFCA, and my son is sponsored as well.

My sister and I both took out a loan from each of our mothers groups to start this curry business. Read more

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Jan 15 2013

Mother in India starts family business

Sathya

Sathya opened her own store with help from a CFCA mothers group loan.

We recently heard from our Hyderabad project in India about several mothers of sponsored children who are exemplifying the potential of families living in poverty. Here’s the story of Sathya – enjoy!

My family and I live in a remote village in India.

My husband used to be a contract worker; the income he earned was not enough to support our family.

I had an opportunity to take out a loan through my mothers group.

I talked with my husband, and we both shared the idea of opening a store in our village.

He supported my idea and agreed to purchase the required materials for the store.

First, I opened the store in our home.

I soon repaid the first loan, and I took out another loan to purchase a kiosk made with wood.

After that was repaid, I asked for a third loan to buy a refrigerator to keep a few cool drinks in the store.

After a few years, my husband left his job and is helping me run the business. Read more

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Jan 4 2013

Widowed mother starts her own business

Md. Baby and her son Anwar.

Md. Baby and her son Anwar.

We recently heard from our Hyderabad project in India about several mothers of sponsored children who are exemplifying the potential of families living in poverty. Hereís the story of Md. Baby ó enjoy!

I was married at an early age. My husband died after the birth of our only son Anwar.

Since then, my problems increased.

I learned to sew after my husband passed away, and I used to go the fields to work as a daily laborer to provide for my family.

When I heard about CFCA sponsorship, I went to apply for the program.

The sponsorship program has given a new hope for me in the form of self-help groups.

As I already knew how to sew, I was interested in opening a tailoring shop that also sells sewing items. Read the rest of Md. Baby’s story

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Oct 24 2012

‘New hope for the future’: Raising livestock to pay for college

Margaret, mother of a sponsored child in Bhagalpur, India.

Margaret, mother of a sponsored child in Bhagalpur, India.

For some families, a college savings plan has four legs, is covered in hair and eats from a slop bucket.

Raising livestock provides additional income for many sponsored friends and their families, and some take out loans through CFCA to help meet family needs such as education.

Margaret, mother of a sponsored youth in India, did just that to help her son, Paulus, pay for his tuition and realize his educational dreams.

“It gave new hope for our future,” Margaret said.

Margaret and her husband, James, live in a small town near Bhagalpur, India. Other than agriculture, there is little opportunity for business in their village.

Margaret and James wanted their son to receive a quality education, but with the nearest college located 24 hours from their home, it was going to be a challenge.

With the help of his CFCA sponsorship and his familyís contribution, Paulus was able to pay for his tuition, as well as room and board, and is receiving a quality education to prepare him for engineering school.
Read more

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Oct 23 2012

Never give up: Kenyan mother starts her own business

When Collins, a young boy in Kenya, joined the Hope for a Family sponsorship program, his mother Roseline embraced the CFCA mothers group and took steps to transform her family’s life.

Roseline, mother of a CFCA sponsored child

Roseline holds a scoop of millet, the grain she sells to earn additional income.

“In our group we share ideas on business ventures and we also encourage each other on personal matters. Ö Our slogan is ‘Jikaze,’ which means ‘do not give up,’” Roseline said.

Through the Hope for a Family sponsorship program, CFCA offers opportunities for families to achieve economic self-sufficiency through mothers groups and other activities.

Roseline is the secretary for her mothers group. She takes the minutes at each meeting and is also the signatory.

Through the mothers group, Roseline has been able to start her own business, something that would not have been possible without the loan she received from her mothers group last September.

Roseline used the loan to purchase 23 tins of millet, which is a type of grain grown widely around the world for cereal. Roseline re-sells the millet to earn additional income for her family.

She has since opened a bank account to save the profits she earns because she is planning to expand her business in the future.

“I would like to encourage my fellow mothers to work hard and make use of the help that CFCA gives them through the CFCA support groups,” Roseline said. “My wish is to see my children succeed in life and help the needy in society.”

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Aug 22 2012

Mothers in Mexico create positive change

Violence is a challenge that many families in Mexico face. In several communities the drug and gang violence has increased dramatically, which has driven some sponsored friends and their families from their homes.

The project staffs have to think of creative ways to help sponsored friends and their families while protecting themselves at the same time.

The Hope for a Family program conducts activities in safe locations that raise awareness among families about positive values and conflict resolution.

Many of the families are led by single mothers, and CFCA small community groups provide mothers with livelihood training workshops, encouragement and support.

We asked two of these mothers, Gloria and Maty, how the Hope for a Family program has helped them with the challenges they face.

Gloria

Gloria, CFCA staff member

Gloria is a CFCA staff member in Guadalupe, Mexico. She is the regional contact person.

Gloria’s 16-year-old son, Juan, was sponsored for 10 years. She was once the leader of her mothers committee and is now in charge of serving eight smaller CFCA communities in the Guadalupe project.

Describe some of the biggest challenges that you have faced as a mother and as a woman.

As a mother, my challenge is raising my child. He is becoming a teenager and his behavior has changed.

I [hope] he will keep practicing values that I, as his mother, tried to instill in him to be a better person.

As a woman, I wish to overcome [obstacles] in life with the opportunities that CFCA offers me. I am very thankful.

How and why did you decide to be a leader in your mothers committee?

I was elected by many mothers and I wanted to participate; of course, I never imagined being in the place that I am now.

What did you learn from this experience and how has it helped you personally?

I learned to listen to people and to help others in need. My participation gave me a lot of satisfaction.
Read more

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Aug 20 2012

Going back to school: Mothers of sponsored children

It’s never too late to learn!

That’s one lesson that mothers of sponsored children taught Diego Felipe Coj Guarchaj, a CFCA staff member in Guatemala who has worked with CFCA for 13 years.

CFCA scholars and mothers go to school in Guatemala

Mothers of sponsored children in Guatemala are going back to school with the help of CFCA scholarships.

It began in 2007, when CFCA staffers started a literacy program in the town of Nahuala for mothers who wanted to learn how to read and write.

CFCA scholars taught the mothers as part of their community service project.

In 2008 more mothers wanted to learn, so the CFCA office in Nahuala contacted Guatemala’s national committee for literacy, a government-run institution that helps people finish their primary education.

In 2011 more than 75 mothers graduated from primary school with that literacy program.

Several of these mothers expressed a desire to continue their education, so the CFCA office encouraged them to apply for CFCA scholarships.

In 2012, Diego said 23 mothers and two fathers are now CFCA scholars. Classes include natural science, social studies, math, computers and writing.

“Twenty-three of the students are in seventh grade, one is in eighth grade, and one mother is in her first year of high school,” Diego said.

(Related link: Read more about the value of education for sponsored children in Guatemala.)

In a country where only 15.6 percent of the female population is educated to at least a secondary level of schooling (think junior high), according to the Human Development Index, the mothers’ achievements show their perseverance despite tremendous challenges. Read more

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