Tag Archives: food

Jun 29 2011

Five ways to ‘visit’ your sponsored friend, part 1

If you haven’t yet been on a mission awareness trip with CFCA, you can still connect with your sponsored friend in other ways. For the next few weeks, we’ll feature five ways you can “visit” your friend.

Liberty Sementelli and the chocolate-making mothers group in Guatemala

Liberty Sementelli, left, helps women in Guatemala with their chocolate business. Read her amazing story of how she raised $1,500 for a chocolate grinding machine.

The first is:

1) Cook a meal native to your friend’s ethnic cuisine.

You can learn a lot about a culture from its cuisine. For instance, why do countries with hot climates have hot food? Do the main dishes contain meat, or can they be made with vegetables (usually much more economical)?

Here are just a few suggestions:

You can find many of these ethnic recipes online.

These make great family dinners and conversation starters. For instance, what is similar and what is different from your usual dining fare?

After sampling food from another country, consider writing about your meal in your next letter. You could also ask what your friend’s favorite food is, and why.

Have you ìvisitedî your friend through food? If so, what dishes have you prepared or sampled?

Related links

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Dec 20 2010

Make a cup of traditional Guatemalan hot chocolate

Chocolate has been part of Latin American culture for 2,000 years. Today, most Latin American cultures serve hot chocolate with tamales during the Christmas season.

In Guatemala, Claudia Mariela and her family live in the community of El Chocolate, so of course, chocolate is part of their lives.

Claudia is the mother of six children, three of whom are sponsored in CFCA’s Hope for a Family program.

Watch this video of Claudia Mariela making Guatemalan hot chocolate, then try making your own using this easy recipe.

Hot chocolate (makes about 2 quarts)

  • 2 7-oz. bars of drinking chocolate (brands such as Ibarra and Abuelita can be found at Hispanic markets)
  • 2 quarts of water
  • Cinnamon sticks (optional)
  • Milk and sugar (optional)

Bring the water to a full, rolling boil.

While the water is coming to a boil, chop up the chocolate or grind it in a blender or food processor. This will help the chocolate dissolve faster. You can also just add the chocolate as is from the box.

Add the chocolate to the boiling water. Stir constantly until the chocolate is dissolved.

Add milk, cinnamon sticks and sugar according to your taste. This chocolate is so rich that you don’t have to add milk.

Lower the heat to medium and continue cooking until well blended, about 15-30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Serve piping hot with tamales. Make your own Christmas tamales.

Want to know the story behind the CFCA mothers group who run a chocolate-making business? Click here to read more.

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Oct 22 2009

Notes from the Field – Bolivia

Jose Rodriguez, CFCA’s project director for South America, talks about his recent visit to Bolivia where he witnessed the work being done by two CFCA scholarship students, Juan and Jhaneth. The students are helping to give back to their own communities by working with families to build greenhouses and teaching local mothers to read.

Watch more Notes from the Field
Donate to the scholarship fund

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Jul 1 2009

Serious fun, part 2

By Rev. Kelly Demo, CFCA preacher

Upon my return from a mission awareness trip to El Salvador, my children were greatly interested in the details of the trip. I told them about our day spent on a volcano, showed them a jar of sand from the beach and pictures of all the beautiful people I met. And, I kept wistfully talking about pupusas, calling them ìSalvadoran comfort food.î

We decided to make pupusas, and we had the most fun! They are so simple to make and so wonderful to eat. The best part, however, was how making dinner together easily fell into a lesson about solidarity. For instance: at first, our dough was too dry. As I went to the sink for more water, I started talking about how hard it often is for the women to get water and how easy it is for us. The kids asked questions about where the water comes from for the Salvadorans and began to understand how a simple faucet is a luxury.

As we pulled the cheese from the refrigerator, my daughter asked me how they keep things cold with no electricity. So, we talked about how they have to go to market every day to buy food since people in developing countries generally donít have a refrigerator. (My kids hate going to the grocery store, so the idea of going to market every day really hit home!)

Below is the recipe for pupusas (they are super easy for kids to make), but we encourage you to do a little research to find kid-friendly recipes from the country where your sponsored friend lives. As you cook with your children or grandchildren, talk with them about what it must be like for their friend to cook. How is it the same? How is it different? Tell them what an indescribable luxury meat is in most countries, but how easily we have access to it here. Have them picture walking up to a mile to fetch water for cooking (this is often the job of children in a family).

Pupusas
(Please supervise children closely during the cooking.)

Ingredients:
2 c. Masa harina (this is a corn flour that can be found in most grocery stores)
1 c. Water
Filling can be grated cheese, refried beans, veggies, whatever!

1. In a bowl mix the Masa harina and water. Knead it well. If you need to, add a teaspoon of water at a time to get a consistency similar to play dough. Set the dough aside to rest for 10 minutes.

2. Roll a ball of dough a little smaller than the size of a baseball and, with your thumb, press a hole in the middle. Pinch the sides a bit to make the hole bigger. Put some of the filling in the hole and pinch it shut. Now comes the fun part. Slap the dough from hand to hand, pressing it out flat. But make sure none of the filling leaks out. They should end up about º – Ω inch thick.

3. Heat an ungreased skillet over medium heat. Cook each pupusa for 1-2 minutes or until golden brown on each side. Serve with salsa.

Related links
Serious fun, part 1
Serious fun: Creative play
Make Filipino oatmeal soup
CFCA food benefits in Kenya

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Mar 31 2009

A simple bag of groceries is important

Sponsor Margaret Looper was recruited to help distribute bags of food to CFCA families one day during her mission awareness trip to Bolivia. She was surprised by how important a simple bag of groceries is to families in need.

Watch more trip testimonials
Hunter Hardin gets to know his friend during a day of fun in Honduras.
A Philippines community puts on a special performance for Colleen Gawley.

A CFCA mission awareness trip is an uplifting experience that will deepen your connection with your sponsored friend and open your eyes to the potential of sponsored members and their families. Spaces are still available on some 2009 trips. Check our trip calendar >

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Feb 2 2009

Dentures restore Graceís smile

By Peter Ndungo, Nairobi project coordinator

Grace is all smilesGrace, 67, is all smiles. She is happy because she has acquired a new set of dentures. She acquired them in August 2008, thanks to CFCA.

Grace has never put so much value to her teeth as she is doing right now. She does not have a history of dental ailments. Her problem has been brought about by age, she says. She started losing her teeth in her 50s. She never thought that teeth would stand in her way of good health until May 2008, when she lost her remaining teeth.

With her new set of teeth, she is now able to chew foods such as githeri (boiled maize and beans), arrowroot, meat, ugali (porridge made with maize flour), chapati and mandazi (baked wheat flour products). She can also chew sugarcane and fruits such as mangoes and oranges.

Her doctor suggested a gradual introduction to such food, and she can now comfortably eat every meal she pleases. Her speech has also improved tremendously, and she canít stop herself from smiling.

Read about dental care in Nairobi.

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Jan 14 2009

CFCA helps families put food on the table

Soaring food prices in 2008 made it more difficult for CFCA families to feed themselves. Though prices have fallen some, a recent United Nations report predicts that the cost of food will remain high in the long run. To improve long-term food security, CFCA has awarded several food grants to help families grow and produce their own food.

Donate to CFCAís Food Assistance Fund now.

Learn more about how you can help.

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