Category Archives: Economic Self-Sufficiency

Don Quique
Dec 15 2014

‘Money goes away. Encouragement fills my spirit’

Don Quique

Luis Enrique shows off piñatas he made for birthday parties to celebrate other sponsored members.

By Alley Stonestreet, bilingual communications manager

Meet Luis Enrique from Costa Rica, better known as Don Quique.

An active man with a big heart, Don Quique is a former construction worker and father of four adult children and grandchildren. He spends his days cultivating his garden with natural fertilizers and making piñatas that he donates to Unbound for birthday parties.

You could say Don Quique isn’t your typical sponsored friend. He’s neither a child nor an elderly man, but he is sponsored. Why?

Unbound does not limit itself when it comes to helping people in the communities we serve. We invite people of goodwill to be part of the Unbound program. This includes those who find themselves in need of assistance because of a disability — physical, mental or otherwise — regardless of their age.

And Don Quique needed that support.

After a brain tumor, two aneurysms and complications from surgery, Don Quique lost his sight several years ago.

He discovered Unbound through one of his grandchildren.

Keep reading

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Urban garden
Dec 5 2014

‘Women in our tradition are relegated to the back’

By Regina Mburu, communications liaison for Unbound in Africa

She hums as she tends to her chickens — filling their bowls with water and food, her hands busy collecting eggs from the poultry house. Her smile and look of satisfaction as she goes about her daily routine tell a story of a woman whose determination stands out. Even among the strong, determined women of her mothers group.

Forty-eight-year-old Margaret lives in the sprawling slums of Kibera in Nairobi, Kenya, with her husband and five children. As we [Unbound staff members] sat down in the tidy living room of her two-room house, made of mud and iron sheets, Margaret told us about her life.

“I have lived in this slum for the last 20 years,” Margaret said. “It is not the ideal environment to raise children in, but I have no choice. This is what my husband and I could afford.”

Keep reading

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Brick makers
Dec 3 2014

Building a better life, brick by brick

Henry and Prossy

Henry and Prossy from Uganda

The ability to read and write opens doors both inside and outside the classroom. Communication connects the world and knowledge is arguably the most life-changing gift one can give.

But for Ugandan parents Henry and Prossy, it was nearly impossible to support the educational needs of their six children.

The family relied on raising animals for an often meager income. Henry was also able to pick up occasional jobs at construction sites, but this wasn’t a reliable source of income. The family’s earnings were not enough to properly educate their children.

In Unbound communities around the world, however, the lives of families are transformed by the sponsorship of even one of their children.

Keep reading

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
turkey stew
Nov 3 2014

Guatemalan mother shares turkey stew recipe

Doña Jesus started raising turkeys about seven years ago to help support her family. It was right around the time her son Diego was sponsored through Unbound. When all of her turkeys got sick and died, she received lots of encouragement from the Unbound staff not to give up. She also got seven turkeys from Unbound to help her restart her business.

To say thank you for all the support and encouragement her family has received, Doña Jesus shared her recipe for turkey stew, which she makes for her family every Christmas.

Get Doña Jesus’ recipe

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Chocolate day
Oct 27 2014

Happy Chocolate Day!

Happy (almost) Chocolate Day! Tomorrow, Oct. 28, is National Chocolate Day. To celebrate, we’re sharing the story of Margarita in Guatemala. Chocolate is an important part of Margarita’s life. And not just hers, but her community’s as well.

“[Chocolate is] the way that I earn for my family’s food expenses and my children’s school expenses,” Margarita said. “When customers place an order, I know how much I will earn for my children. …”

Chocolate is also important for others in my community because sometimes I need help and I give them work. I ask for their help to peel and roast cocoa beans. It takes about 10 people to peel 100 pounds of cocoa beans in one or two days.”

Continue reading Margarita’s story

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Father of a sponsored friend making treats on his food cart
Aug 27 2014

Food cart paves way for brighter future

Father of a sponsored friend prepares bola-bola on his food cart.

Marcelino prepares bola-bola on his food cart.

Food carts are part of everyday life in the Philippines, and one of the popular snacks offered is bola-bola. Bola-bola is made from fish that has been pounded into a paste, rolled into balls and fried. Customers skewer a piece from the vendor’s frying pan and dip the tasty treat in a sauce of their choice.

Marcelino owns one of these food carts and sells bola-bola. His daughter Jenny is sponsored through Unbound. Jenny’s sponsorship supplements the income Marcelino makes from farming and the food cart, helping the family meet their basic needs and build a path out of poverty.

Marcelino uses what he makes selling bola-bola to help pay his children’s school fees. His goal is to help his children get a good education and achieve their dreams.

Help support a family in need. Sponsor today!

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email
Sponsor a child
Aug 15 2014

Gratitude from the cabbage patch

Diamondra, a sponsored child from Madagascar

Diamondra wears the new dress she received for her birthday.

By Barclay Martin, new channels coordinator

Recently Barclay Martin traveled to Madagascar to record a CD with sponsored members and their families. On the trip, he also visited several sponsored members’ homes. This is the story of one of those visits.

Read more

Share this post:
Facebook Twitter Pinterest Plusone Reddit Email