May 16 2013

Harry’s trip experiences from Cali, Colombia

CFCA sponsored child in Cali, Colombia

Harry gets help with a photo shoot from Juan, a sponsored child in Cali.

Harrison Garcia, CFCA communications center liaison for Colombia, recently returned from a visit to the city of Cali, Colombia. Read his personal experience of visiting sponsored friends and the beautiful friendships he made.

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May 9 2013

Kenyan families recovering after Nyando River flooding

Floodwaters are finally receding on the Nyando River in Western Kenya, and CFCA sponsored friends and their families are now safe to re-enter their homes to assess the damage. Thankfully, all emerged physically safe. Continue reading

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May 9 2013

Happiness in hen manure: Organic fertilizers in CFCA communities

Romelia, a sponsored child, and her father, Siriaco, use organic fertilizer in their garden.

Romelia, a sponsored child, and her father, Ciriaco, use organic fertilizer in their garden.

Ciriaco, the father of a sponsored child, and his family in Guatemala utilize every possible resource for gardening on hand. Or should we say, on hen.

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Apr 26 2013

Seeds for the future: CFCA-Guatemala develops reforestation project

Reforestation seedbed in CFCA-Guatemala

Mothers in Guatemala tend to tree seedlings in a reforestation project they created to help restore their local environment.

Today is Arbor Day! In one area of Guatemala, one community started a new initiative to grow two trees for each sponsored child.

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Apr 10 2013

Learning about quinoa, a South American staple

Quinoa

CFCA families in Bolivia harvest quinoa and other crops to be able to feed their families.

By Emily Soetaert, CFCA correspondent

If you’re aware of healthy eating trends or are environmentally conscious, chances are you’ve heard of (and may have eaten) quinoa.

Pronounced “keen-WAH,” this South American grain has recently taken the western world by storm. Its unusual taste and high nutrition value (particularly in the protein area) give many a reason to love it.

What we may not know, however, is that increased demand for quinoa has created some unintended consequences.

Before quinoa’s spike in popularity, the crop could be purchased in Bolivia for less than $4 a pound. That price has more than doubled to $8 a pound.

Many South American families who previously relied on quinoa for daily nourishment can no longer afford to purchase it.

According to a column in The Guardian, for many people living in Peru and Bolivia, quinoa now costs more than chicken because of rising costs and overseas demands.

Adelio, who helps cultivate quinoa and is the father of a sponsored child, Pamela, in Bolivia, said quinoa is an important food in the local diet.

“Families in rural areas usually eat what they produce, and quinoa is part of their diets,” Adelio said. “Quinoa is a very fragile crop to produce, and it takes about six months before picking the crop.”

Fortunately, families in the CFCA program in Bolivia still have access to this dietary staple.

“We still have families who work farming the quinoa as well as other crops to be able to feed their families,” Adelio said. “They help each other by trading crops that they produce over the years.”

Through sponsorship support and their own ingenuity, families in the CFCA program are able to cope with economic challenges such as rising food prices.

Besides its nutritional value, quinoa has the added benefit of being an environmentally friendly crop.

“The demand for quinoa is large because it is a natural product, which does not require chemicals to enhance it,” Adelio said. “For this reason, it is less harmful for the environment.”

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